Once More To The Pavement

Just Keep Running

Now that I know I’ve no blockages in my arteries, I felt confident enough to go for a plodding jog. I maintained a languid pace and never let my heart rate exceed 140. The average was 124. At no point did I push myself into labored breathing. Also, I didn’t feel “thickness” in my muscles. They felt relaxed and limber. In the past three years, I experienced, for lack of a better word, congestion of the muscles. It created a feeling of weight or resistance that bogged down my running.

Today, that wasn’t the case. I felt, again, for lack of a better word, release. There was no resistance in my steps or breathing. Let me stress – especially in my breathing. Even after the slowest of walks, my lungs would feel congested. Not today. Even my sinuses don’t feel as congested. Most important of all, there is no feeling of overwhelming exhaustion.

After the last three years of starting and restarting my exercise regime with disappointing results, I feel hopeful. I won’t make any wild claims of “halleluja! I’m cured!” but I am willing to say that I feel confident. I voiced hope things had changed in the past, but I didn’t feel hope. Today, I feel hopeful that things have changed.

No Blockage!

The Castle

I have just arrived home following my angiogram—no blockages to report. The procedure usually lasts about an hour. Mine took 20 minutes. They spent more time prepping than performing the procedure. Plus, I had to wait 90 minutes to ensure my artery clotted afterward to ensure I didn’t squirt blood everywhere. Personally, I thought they were being party poopers. What’s wrong with little blood spatters on the hospital walls? It fits with the Gestalt, don’t you think?

However, they did find a small buildup of fluid. So, while I don’t have to take any statins, aspirin, or nitro, I am prescribed Lisinopril. And I’ve been told to reduce my intake of fluids. No more than eight cups of water per day. That’s cool. Most beautiful of all, I am now expected to exercise. I had stopped exercising due to the fear of arterial blockage and the possibility of a heart attack. But that is no longer a fear, and I can resume exercise.

While arterial blockages have been ruled out, there is a need to learn about the cause of the conductive block reducing heart productivity. So, more appointments. Fortunately, reasonable levels of exercise, i.e., keeping my heart rate below 140 during workouts, are called for in combating fluid retention. Oh, and I guess taking Lisinopril should help me lose weight. All in all, a better outcome than I feared.

Keeping UP

Just Keep Running

After a day off, I hopped on the treadmill. I am not a fan of the treadmill, but running outdoors is not a safe option with the miserable weather.

Having caught up with my stats, I’m keeping up.

Incremental Marathon Catch-Up

Just Keep Running

I took a short break from running due to some severe back pain. Especially my lower back. A few chiropractic visits and discontinuing a particular medication appear to have done the trick. I am posting one run that occurred before the brief break and the two most recent runs. Also, note that I managed to get an outdoor run yesterday.

Just Another Incremental Marathon Post

Just Keep Running

I kept it simple and light. I am not in any shape to push myself beyond my ability. I’ve reached a weight I’ve never been at before – though I suspect I was close to this weight in 2013 or 14 when I took up jogging after 30 years – and it’s taking its toll on me. Currently, my only goal is to put effort into exercising. I have no expectations around weight goals, pace goals, or outcomes. Around 2017 or 2018, I reached 209 pounds and was close to breaking the nine-minute mile. I didn’t have those goals in mind; they happened because of my focus on exercising.

Anyway, to the stats:

Way Too Long

Just Keep Running

It has been three months since I last did any exercise. My Strava records show I last ran on December 6th, 2022. Today was a treadmill run. Anyway, to the stats:

After The Collapse

Just Keep Running

I collapsed. That is the best description of what happened during November. My last run was on October 30th. After that, I became exhausted. Mentally and physically. And then, the week before and after Thanksgiving was overwhelming, having to deal with the arrival of furniture from the estate of Tina’s mother out of Green Bay. I also had to drive to and from Green Bay in forty-eight hours. So, yeah, I collapsed. My motivation went into seclusion. I stopped doing my schoolwork. I made errors at work with billing for groups. I also forgot to generate some necessary forms for intakes. All the while, my body ached. My muscles felt like they had run three miles every day. My back hurt to the point of keeping me up all night.

This past Saturday was peak collapse. I had no physical energy, no mental energy. I was even starting to suffer emotionally. I ended up in bed early Saturday night.

I woke up Sunday morning to an entirely different experience. My exhaustion was lifted. My body no longer ached. And my motivation came out of hiding. I emailed my professors to arrange for make-up work so I can pass my classes this semester. I went for a run with pleasantly surprising stats. I went on another run this morning, but to lower stats than Sunday’s. And I managed to make it through work yesterday without any charting errors.

I’ve experienced physical and mental reductions before. It seems to be a recurring cycle. Unfortunately, this down cycle coincided with the above-normal life stressors mentioned earlier, possibly worsening the decrease. I can’t help but wonder if it’s due to long COVID. Anyway, it’s lifted for the time being, and I’ll not complain.

Now, to the stats: